On Stream:https://store.steampowered.com/app/274500/Brigador_UpArmored_Edition/

About This Game

Brigador relaunches in 2017 with expanded introductory missions, localization, easier difficulty and revised controls, plus improved lighting effects, mechanics, and more.

Here is your contract

Brigador is an isometric roguelite of intense tactical combat. Play as mercenary pilots betraying their planet, looking for the big payout and a ticket off this planet. Everything you destroy earns the pilots money that can be used to unlock even more destructive vehicles, guns, and challenges. Find the right load out for your playstyle and wreak havoc on the city of Solo Nobre.

Escape off-world with your money or die trying




Features

  • Unlock 56 different mechs, tanks, hovercraft, with 40 different weapons
  • 100% destructible environments
  • Expanded 37 mission Campaign Mode with continuing developer support
  • Expanded and updated 20+ map Freelance mode with variable difficulty and challenge for all skill levels
  • Deep and engaging dark science fiction universe and lore
  • Original soundtrack by Makeup & Vanity Set, over 2 hours of acclaimed synth music
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista or later.
    • Processor: 2.6 GHz or faster
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: AMD Radeon 5770 / NVIDIA GTX 460 or better
    • Storage: 1 GB available space
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AvalonGuard

Posted: June 2, 2017
Brigador is a vehicular shooter with a killer aesthetic and tight gameplay that rewards good play no matter how you go about it. Smart, stealthy players will have a serious challenge ahead, but the payouts will be massive. Not up to the crazy hard, grueling endurance runs? No problem. Grab a big mech with a big gun and wreak havoc and guess what? You’ll still get paid, and you can do it in three missions.

This isn’t really a twin-stick shooter; WASD are your chassis movement controls and your turret/torso are controlled with a mouse. I definitely do not recommend using a controller at all as you’ll lose some serious precision which you’ll need. There are options to significantly reduce the game speed if needed, so if you’re jonesing for a controller game Brigador will do in a pinch.

The Freelance mode, with static maps but random enemy placements, will be the meat of your time with the game. Pick any vehicle, weapons, and level setups you’ve unlocked and GO!

The campaign is decent fun, with unique and static scenarios. You’ll be rewarded very well for each level and vehicle pair you complete, so if you’re enjoying youself, go back and clear the level again with a completely different vehicle.

The Deluxe Edition is well-worth it for the music alone, and the Audiobook is great military sci-fi fun.

I wholeheartedly recommend Brigador to anyone who likes action games. $20 is a steal for how much you’ll get and there’s more to come; the devs have been releasing more pilots, vehicles, and missions since release, along with balancing and the like.

Captain Casual

Posted: May 21, 2017
So there i was, aimlessly wandering the wastes of the Steam store, seeing if i find something that stands out. Something that manages to impress me. Something that isn’t just a generic clone of something else.
And then i found this. Looked interesting, so i thought i’d give it a whirl. And very quickly, i found myself thinking "Good heavens, why have i never heard of this game, before?".
Truly, i had found the very definition of a hidden gem.

It has the vibe of the original Syndicate. It has the music (And the somewhat cryptic lore/plot) of Hotline Miami. And rather gracefully, it brings these elements together in a mech/tank/hovertank action game where you level entire city blocks.

A quick run-down of the setting: The game takes place in the city of Solo Nombre, on the planet Novo Solo, an off-world colony far from earth.

A while ago, this colony was taken over by a dictator simply known as "Great leader", who turned the colony into a North-Korea style, hyper-isolationist city-state.

Tonight, he has died.

Pretty much immediately, you have a rebel uprising happening, loyalists trying to cling to the old ways, a highly advanced outside faction called the "spacers" using the opportunity to essentially invade, and your employer, a shady corporation, hiring mercs to "represent their interests" as well. And it’s all happening in one night. A battle royale to be sure!
Oh, don’t worry though, despite the game being set all in the same night, the devs were kind enough not to give us time limits. (Thank you devs!)

As for the gameplay, it’s quite a good mix. On easier difficulty settings, with stronger vehicles, you will pretty much steamroll everything, but get fairly small rewards. The higher the difficulty gets and the more challenging the vehicle you pick, the more you will have to play it smart and carefully, but the richer you will become. It’s quite charming that way.


Anyways, i’m truly hoping that this game gets a bit of a late updraft in popularity. Maybe it’s just me, but i had never even heard of it before i randomly stumbled upon it in the store, the other day. And for a game this fun, that’s just not right.


So yeah, a clear thumbs up. I heartily recommend you give this game a whirl, and i hope it’s been successful enough for the devs to make future titles!

BODACIOUS BARTHOLOMEW

Posted: June 10, 2016
With its hulking, calamitous warmachines, cold, stylish synth-laden soundtrack, and grim totalitarian setting, Brigador feels like an iron-handed ode to all the classic isometric sci-fi games of the nineties. To put it bluntly, it kicks a lot of♥♥♥♥♥ There is just something really special about eviscerating everything in your way (yes, as the trailer says, *everything*) in a 50 ft. metallic beast that spews molten death, while armed forces hopelessly throw everything they got at you to put an end to your orgy of annihilation. It is just ♥♥♥♥ing rad.

As someone who grew up with Crusader, Syndicate, Command & Conquer, Mech Commander and a bunch of other PC games of their ilk, Brigador made me a little teary-eyed. It was like I was a kid again, gleefully playing on my crappy hand-me-down computer that could barely run Red Alert 2. I haven’t played a game that made me feel like that in a long time.

Just Juice

Posted: June 2, 2017
It’s like if Future Cop LAPD and Hotline Miami had a baby.

Fun vehicles and destruction, great music and art. Brigador is a clean and polished experience from the start menu to the cockpit. All the elements blend so well. The game really feels like a labor of love.

Agent Cooper

Posted: July 20, 2016
Absolutely superb isometric mech action. One can sense genuine effort and artistry that were poured into it, from its satisfying and responsive action (once one gets used to tank controlls that grace most of game’s vehicles, something we rarely see today) to its gorgeously crafted visuals and remarkable soundtrack.

While most folks will understandably start with game’s campaign mode, freelance mode is where the real fun is. Unlike campaign mode, which oft gives choice between few predefined vehicles for each mission, freelance mode offers insane variety of vehicles and weapons one can purchase through credits earned in each mission, as well as variety of meaty new missions to unlock. Weapons differ vastly in their properties and behaviour, and are mostly really fun to use, so that already high replayability is additionaly enhanced with player’s desire to try out all those different ways of unleashing glorious mass destruction upon the world.

Game is also oozing with olden style cyberpunk mood and is trully gorgeous to look at, especially once action is at its pinnacle with gratuitous explosions and laser beams filling the screen, and with game’s destructible environments showing their crunchy best.

All in all, remarkably well crafted game, and one that is chock full of content. That it received next to no media and gamer attention, compared to various unmentionable indie chaff that is oft glorified by the media and is endlessly promoted by its soul-dead playerbase, just shows how bad this industry’s state really is.

atomicthumbs

Posted: January 11, 2017
You are Luis Leng, a single Brigador in a small Mongoose powersuit. You have a light machine gun mounted to one arm, a light-caliber cannon in the other, a stolen Spacer camo system, and an Opportunity. Nobody knows you’re there. Your targets are waiting in a country chalet. Overwhelming firepower guards them. You have made entrance to the district undetected, and you have an overview of the situation, courtesy of your employers. You sneak through the forest, knock down a hedge with your legs, forge your own path. You are still undetected. An enormous tank idles in front of the villa; its hardshields are lowered. They weren’t expecting you. You aim between the trees, put an 84mm Carlos round in it, and it comes out the other side. The tank stops idling. Two scout vehicles approach from the other direction, attracted by the noise. You pepper them with 8mm Bonesaw rounds and they stop investigating. Your Carlos’s autoloader slams a new shell into the breech and locks. You put your second cannon round of the day through the palatial house, blasting it to smithereens. Heavy tanks approach from the east. You flip the switch on your optic camo system; it buzzes to life, and you disappear into the underbrush. Three more targets to go.

You are Arturo Nemi, to make it simple; your body came with that name. You are a Brigador piloting an Arlo. Your Auxilliary hardpoint is fitted with a Broiler multi-discharge laser. Your Small hardpoint is fitted with a Black Hand. Something resembling a megaphone on steroids is fitted to the side mount. You like it that way. It’s flexible. Your contract is freeform: it requires you to do as much damage as possible to forward the SNC’s interests, which happen to align with your own. You cruise *through* the slums of Solo Nobre, using your agrav’s hull to smash a tunnel towards your objective. A running tally of casualties and your payout for same updates in the corner of your vision. You’re going for the big money, though. An orbital gun towers in front of you; mechs and agravs surround it. You close in behind a wall, and activate your audiokinetic pulse; you hear a tremendous echoing roar, bouncing off everything around you, and the orbital gun and everything around it start to crumble, followed immediately by an echoing explosion. You hear loud footsteps, approaching rapidly from around a corner, and aim your Black Hand at the wall; you see nothing, but a crackling hiss emits from it as you command it to fire. You watch with detached interest as the civilians running from your machine slump over, twitching and screaming, and the mechanical footsteps become erratic and stop. You pull around the corner and blast the stragglers’ hulls to pieces with your Broiler. Three more guns to go.

You are Johnny Five Aces, legend of the timestream, renowned pilot of every sort of vehicle, legendary shot with a revolver, and renowned dapper gentleman. You are driving a Treehouse, a terrifying agglomeration of cars and tanks, thirty feet tall. You have a Ploughman 132mm chemical munitions launcher, aimed by a pair of steering wheels on your left, and a König 30mm rotary autocannon (known by another name, long ago), aimed by another pair on your right; you also have a smoke grenade launcher, but hiding is for dishonorable cowards. You grind your way into a necropolis, turning tombstones to powder underneath your treads. A scout spots you, and radios for backup. Dozens of huge walkers and heavy tanks come into view, bringing their guns to bear. You hold down the trigger of your König and furiously crank the traverse across them, filling them with depleted uranium. You hear a series of deafening cracks, and another, closer one from your hardshields as your generator shorts out; pivoting your vehicle, you see Mantis mechs, Loyalists with Galinha railguns, already far too close, followed by Touros and a few Mongoose pilots in suits. You aim the Ploughman at the Mantises, fire, and advance into the ominous white cloud toward the mechs behind them. A horrible creak emits from below you, as your Treehouse starts to melt; you’ve made a terrible mistake. The windshield of the station wagon-turned-cockpit pits and flows away, dissolved by the Tubarão; you are next, as the vapor drifts into your cockpit. Like a ball pushed off the edge of a cliff, you scream as the Treehouse is transformed back into the raw materials it was built from (scrap metal). You will never see Nina again, nor engage in cosmos-shattering intercourse with her, because you have died.

Welcome, Brigador.

Brigador’s controls take a little while to get used to, especially if you haven’t played an isometric game in a long time. I recommend binding a mouse button to "align to mouse"; it’ll become second-nature quickly. The gameplay is both tactically and strategically deep, and extremely fun. The lore is both fascinating and well-written; the pilots have bios, the weapons and vehicles have intel summaries written like a technical manual, and there’s plenty of other information to unlock as you earn the money to do so. I hear there’s a novel and I’m looking forward to checking it out.

In short, I recommend it.

Zhev

Posted: June 11, 2017
Neon pistons and tight controls, make this Iso- cyberMech game damn near perfect. With an array of vehicles to choose from , some dabs of Roguelite blended with deep lore and total destruction of Solo Nobre.

Not to mention a soundtrack that can jive with Hotline.

Commander

Posted: May 4, 2017
Where to start.

Brigador is an isometric vehicle action game in which you are a pilot from one of three factions given a unique opportunity to make a large sum of money.

Solo Nobre is a city on the colony world of Solo Novo. Years ago, control of it was seized from the sponsoring corporations that founded it in a militant uprising led by a man known only as Great Leader. Great Leader ensured his control over the city by erecting a series of orbital cannons meant to ward off any invasion from above while his armies secured Solo Nobre through military force and the division of the city into walled districts. All contact with the outside world and the galaxy at large was cut off, with Great Leader’s watchful cannons ensuring the security of Solo Nobre.

This seizure of power was not without opposition. At the end of the Nobrean Civil War, a surviving band of revolutionaries, the Corvids, began to slowly rebuild and make plans of a new revolt, for they believe that the only way for Solo Nobre to prosper is under a free and democratic government. This goal, to them, must be reached no matter the cost.

The Solo Nobre Concern, a shadowy organization created by the founding interests of Novo Solo, wish to retake their rightful property. That’s where you come in.

Tonight, Great Leader has died. The Loyalist Military under his command is in disarray, and the Corvids have taken this opportunity to launch their own uprising and have already seized several districts. In addition to this, the Spacers, a transhuman mercenary element from Deep Space have arrived upon Novo Solo in search of profit and glory. You are a Brigador- a paid mercenary hired by the Solo Nobre Concern to carry out certain military objectives within the confines of Solo Nobre, with the end goal of liberating the city in one night and allowing it to shelter once more under the umbrella of economic prosperity provided by the SNC.

Whether you’re a defecting Loyalist in search of passage offworld, an opportunistic Corvid looking for personal gain, or a ravenous Spacer thirsting for glory and wealth, only one thing matters tonight.

Great Leader is dead.

Solo Nobre must fall.

Here is your Contract.

Do you accept?

=================================================================

The game itself is fantastic. Smooth controls (they may take some getting used to, but alternate control schemes are available in options), beautiful visuals that look like a proper evolution from a 90’s action game (unlike so many "retro" games these days, who simply awkwardly pantomime the style), and a fantastic soundtrack (by Makeup and Vanity Set) that immerses you starting from the main menu.

You have a vast selection of vehicles, weapons, and special abilities that will aid you in your mission to bring destruction to Solo Nobre, and the three factions each have their own selection of platforms across three types (Mechs, Tanks, and Antigravity Vehicles). Each faction also has a wide selection of pilots who serve as difficulity and income multipliers, as well as revealing intimate background information about themselves and the factions they serve.

The writing is superb, with the background slowly coming into full view as you unlock equipment, pilots, intelligence entries on enemy vehicles, and a good spread of dediated lore entries as well that elaborate upon the world of Novo Solo and the galaxy at large. If you enjoy the sort of storytelling where everything isn’t immediately apparent and you must work to unlock the world’s secrets, then Brigador will satisfy you.

One final thing that I personally appreciate is that the Devs are very active in the game’s discussion forums, and won’t hesitate at all to listen to your comments, or answer any and all questions about anything related to the game and its development.

On top of being a fantastic game, it’s going to be growing even further. The Devs have announced that on June 2nd they’ll be rolling out a re-release that adds more vehicles, pilots, and a redone tutorial campaign as well as an entirely new campaign. Whether anything else will be hiding among these goodies, I can’t say, but I know that I’m looking forward to June 2nd. It will also be going on sale then, which will no doubt encourage many more to try it.

If you like gritty science fiction, kick♥♥♥♥♥action, amazing electronic soundtracks, and fantastic writing, give Brigador a chance. I doubt you’ll be disappointed.

-CF- Boris_Johnson

Posted: November 7, 2017
It is 1993 and you have the best gaming PC the world can provide… and this is the game you play.

Later you may watch the new Blade Runner Director’s Cut VHS, while drinking Tab Clear.

It’s 2017 and really all you need to do is find a new drink. Life is good

BarcodeBattler

Posted: June 14, 2018
TL;DR: I love this game. This game is not going to be to everyone’s taste.

Brigador is a bizarre beast. If you watch some gameplay footage, you’ll see it’s a game about someone in some sort of armored vehicle, speeding around, and leaving in a trail of destruction.

You can’t really miss that much. But the game is a damn iceberg and that stuff is the tip.

I didn’t expect depth from a game like this. Or a surprising amount of nostalgia too. This game plays as much like the Desert Strike series on the Megadrive/Genesis and SNES (mercifully without any fuel demands) as it does any twitchy twin stick shooter – and that isn’t so obvious from the gameplay footage.

For one level, the game Brigador most felt like to me was Hitman: Codename 47 (the very first game, before the series truly found its feet). I’d clear targets, little chance of surviving a straight up fight, not even speed to just hit-and-run them all, and needed to think of the level as a puzzle and a search for a path of least resistance. When I finished that level (with the ridiculous amount of flowers) I felt a kind of satisfaction I hadn’t since the day I texted ‘LEE HONG IS DEAD’ to a friend with no other context. We both knew exactly what that meant. We’d both been there.

The setting for this game has executed lore in a way that puts RPGs to shame. There’s a monopoly on that information. Held by people of ill repute. You pay significant costs for it, up front. No refunds. That money you’re paying feels HARD earned. There are no freebies or audiologs falling out of the pockets of your foes here. Not one voice acted pilot will verbally barf exposition or their life story at you. These people are the same ones that throw on contrived fees for every failed mission so on death you get a pittance.

You grow to hate them. You should.
Oh. And these are your business partners and your only way out of escaping a planet ran by a dictator. These are as close as you’ll get to people who aren’t your fellow idiomatic crabs in the barrel.

You’re in this position because you’re in no position to bargain. EVERYTHING you earn feels you got gipped (massive transaction fees hinting at corruption, or a budget for Brigador payments that reflected you beat the odds and survived when they calculated you were as good as dead the minute you accepted the contract). It feels like a one player version of shady EVE intrigue. There’s an angle being worked by big players. You’re just a detail here. A replaceable part. And both everything you learn and everything you do to learn more about it reinforces you’re not a big deal here. There’s some astronomical gap in power here between a player and the powers that be in this game. The kind of gap that normally only appears in horror like Lovecraft’s or a setting like Shadowrun where no matter how big you are, you’re no match for the smallest of dragons.

You get told what you need to (if even that much…) and then lead on your way to blow it up. Don’t expect pluck, or tones of anime shonen heroism in mechas. There are no genki girls and any ‘I believe in you’ best friends are filling the collosal numbers of graves that appear in some levels. The level design in what is shown in abundance and what is shown barely both hint of a planet that is closer to warhammer 40,000. Not all the way grimdark, but even the vice and black market seem like they were being rationed out by Great Leader.

Until mission 1 began the’s signs there was barely law here. Before mission 1 ends you feel what a Brigador must feel. You started pumped up, over-equipped and under informed. Then confusion over the importance of what to do and what to absolutely not to do. Then frustration. Then a decision. Then you realise you’re not going to be proud of what you’re doing today. Then you do it. Then you get paid far too little and feel a mix of self loathing and ripped off. And that feeling of being ripped off makes it clear – now there is no law here.

This all happens with no cut scenes and less than 12 words of dialog. You’re also given a choice that isn’t immediately obvious. Looking at the statistics a lot of people either don’t ever realise it is there or act in a way that makes the planet wide space dystopia that much more believable (look at rate of globally unlocked achievements closely). It’s the best kind of morality system – mechanically none at all, and only the painful hindsight that many people could have been a better person. But they didn’t. And here we all are now.

So yeah, it’s clear I like the feel and the setting. Now, is there enough GAME to be worth the money?

Oh yeah. A ridiculous looking Scrapheap Challenge weldjob on meth (called a Treehouse) firing gas canisters like artillery, that melt anyone or thing like they’re xenomorph blood has to be seen to be believed.

A nippy little high speed atrocity platform that feels like it was used by the Cylons with about as much regard for human life, that (on middle click) can make whatever is in front of it die in a war crime every is something that takes LOTS of practice to get the hang of. Especially when you’re firing it every 7 seconds.

A Mantis with a twin pair of Belters feels like a scaled up ED209 with less subtly (somehow). And you’re in it a planet with no stairs you can’t flatten, no Robocop you can’t stomp, no executives alive to react to Mr. Kinney’s glitch induced high caliber acupuncture.

Killdozer? Killdozer.

Whatever you pick, it’s not just about thoroughly doing the job. It’s about getting to the shuttle alive to collect payment in full. And everything on the way feeling like it is trying to kill you. Even if some of those people are fleeing for their lives. And your mind is not on where you step anymore.

Soundtrack: One of my all time favs. One more reason I love this game. Check out Makeup & Vanity Set on Bandcamp to listen to it.

UPDATE:
Bought the audiobook DLC.
Money well spent.

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