On Stream:https://store.steampowered.com/app/586200/Street_Fighter_30th_Anniversary_Collection/

About This Game

Celebrate Street Fighter’s historic legacy with the Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection. In this massive collection of 12 Street Fighter titles, perfect arcade balance makes it to consoles and PC for the first time ever. Four groundbreaking titles let you hop online and relive the arcade experience through the online Arcade Mode or play with friends – SFII Hyper Fighting, Super SFII Turbo, SF Alpha 3 and SFIII: Third Strike!

The celebration continues in the Museum, where fans and historians alike can follow the timeline of how Street Fighter has evolved over the past 30 years. Learn more about the Street Fighter cast, view key animation sprites in the character viewer and take a behind-the-scenes look at the design documents that helped solidify the franchise that produced generations of World Warriors!
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows 7 (64-bit Required)
    • Processor: Intel i3 @ 3.0GHz or AMD equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel HD 4440
    • DirectX: Version 11
    • Storage: 6 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX compatible soundcard or onboard chipset
    • Additional Notes: Compatible with XInput and DirectInput USB devices including gamepads and arcade sticks. Xbox 360 Controller for Windows Recommended
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M_W

Posted: July 26, 2018
Whether or not you want to buy this product depends entirely on what you intend to get out of it.

If you just want a simple, convenient way to play the arcade versions of legendary Capcom fighters, and you have a 16:9 screen with 1080p resolution, this package will suffice, though it’s nothing extraordinary.

If you take fighting games and their competitive potential seriously, or even just an arcade enthusiast who wants to see the best representation of these classic titles as possible, look elsewhere. This title is a lazy, low-effort cash grab to capitalize on the legacy of a series, a love and respect for which Capcom evidently does not share with its fans.

First, the feature set of this collection is a joke: half of the features in this game were half-baked for the purpose of putting more bullet-points on the box. The sprite viewer is a joke: it collects SOME sprites from SOME characters for SOME games, training mode was an afterthought that was put together weeks before release (more on how this manifests later), online play is only available for four games in total (one of the omitted games is Street Fighter Alpha 2, of all things), and the UI is a mess, with some very obvious features omitted for no apparent reason.

Then there’s the technical issues. Some of these are exclusive to the PC, and aren’t relevant to the console release, but are worth mentioning.

Despite being a collection of arcade games from the 1990’s that ran in resolutions no higher than 384×240 (I think), resolutions under 1920×1080 scale down extremely poorly, and playing in a 4:3 aspect ratio letterboxes the entire game, which is pillarboxed inside the 16:9 render, meaning playing on a 4:3 display results in the game taking up a small box in the center of the screen at best. This is a small minority of people who will be playing, I realize, but considering reasonably modern remasters of old fighting games (Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike Online Edition comes to mind) account for those playing on 4:3 displays, I don’t think it’s unreasonable to expect the same from here.

The problem goes the other way, too. Since this game is designed for 1080p on console, the scaling options make no sense when you’re playing on a higher resolution. The "original" setting for these games makes perfect sense at 1080p, as its performing a perfect 4x vertical integer scale, which is why is doesn’t take up the whole screen. Change the setting to "full" and it will stretch the image to fit the screen vertically and apply a (admittedly very well-implemented) linear filter to avoid uneven pixel sizes and the resulting visual artefacts. When playing on a 1440p monitor, the "original" setting takes up the same amount of relative screen space, but since it’s being upscaled from 1080p, is not a perfect integer scale, and when changing it to "full" you’re getting the same result, which SHOULD result in a perfect 6x vertical integer scale, but it doesn’t, because this simply wasn’t accounted for.

Oh, the netcode is garbage. It’s really, really awful. If you played Street Fighter V and thought Capcom’s implementation of rollback netcode was bad in THAT game, you haven’t seen anything yet. I’m told there are specific reasons it’s so bad, which I understand to be the results of oversights and failure to understand the technology on the part of the developers, but I’m honestly not qualified to speak on this. Suffice to say, you’ll encounter slowdowns, stutters, desyncs, and all sorts of unpelasurable interactions when playing any of the online-enabled titles over the internet.

Now, there’s one thing about this game for which Capcom has gotten a lot of flack, and I think it’s in some ways a bit undeserved (I know, ME being nice to Capcom, right?): the fact that all of these games are emulations. Simply put, emulation–well implemented–can be a fantastic way for classic games to be re-released on new platforms. It’s simply not practical to take the source code for a bunch of arcade games written for different, incredibly specific, thirty year-old, arcade hardware, and porting it to work on modern operating systems. And creating these games from scratch is inviting all sorts of inconsistencies with the original arcade versions (the PS2 console version of Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike, for instance, had several differences from arcade in ways that did matter to competitive play. Even the otherwise exellent Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike Online edition–based on the PS2 source code–had its fair share of minor inconsistencies).

As for the emulation itself, it’s actually quite good. Performance (at least on my machine and anecdotal evidence I’ve personally seen) is good, there are no obvious glitches that are the result of innacurate emulation, and the video output, as long as you’re playing in 1080p, is actually quite good. Input lag definitely isn’t ideal, but on par with what you’ll get playing these games on fan-made emulators with out-of-the-box settings, V-synced.

What ISN’T good, and what Capcom deserve every bit of flack for, is how poorly realized the frontend and UI for these emulators are, and some really silly oversights in setting these emulators up.

Though the sound is emulated accurately, some of these games were left with the original arcade versions’ default settings, leaving all of the sound and music in mono, despite these titles being capable of stereo sound (The biggest offender is the Street Fighter III series). Luckily, this is a fix you can do yourself, since the options for this are in an xml file in the game’s data (search the steam forums for how to do this).

You know how I mentioned training mode was put together last minute? Since these games are played via emulation of the arcade versions, there is no way to play training mode as-is. Some hacks and modifications to the original rom, as well as some external scripting, were needed to make this possible. I commend whatever team toiled to put together a training mode as good as it is mere weeks before release, but the time constraints and limitations of the technology really, really show.

There are all sorts of odd glitches and misbehavior as a result of this hacked together training mode (in SFIII:3S, any hit that would normally KO the opponent in versus/arcade will not do the proper amount of hitstun, and will cause combos and setups to fail for no obvious reason. It took me all of an hour of training mode my first time playing this collection to figure this one out). Though less of a glitch as an issue of implemenation, any effects that are persistent until the beginning of the next round will be permanent as long as you’re in the same session of training mode. Did you perform 3 taunts as Q and want to reset your defense back to round start? Looks like you’ll have to quit the game and go back to character select. No save state in training mode. It’s in arcade mode, but not training mode, WHY CAN I SAVE/LOAD STATES IN ARCADE MODE BUT NOT TRAINING MODE AAAAAAAAAAAAGHHHHHHHHHHHHH.

There’s also only one recording slot. This was annoying an unnaceptable in previous releases, just as much so now.

Honestly, the only reason I will personally will not be asking for a refund is because the training mode, however flawed, is still better than any solutions that have been put out by fans for fan-based emulators.

And I think this illustrates the biggest problem overall with the collection: in just about every way, fan-made tools offer a better experience than what’s in this package. Fan made emulators will offer better audio and video options, the potential for lower input lag if you’re willing to really tinker around with stuff, better overall controller support. Hell, there are fan-made, netplay-enabled emulators that you use to play every game in this collection online, and with genuinely fantastic implementation and performance. The only saving grace of this collection is, ironically, it’s least polished feature.

MisterKennedy84

Posted: November 10, 2018
They finally made a nice update : upgraded players to the international version which allows the players to switch between the japanese and american versions of the games. This is important because the AI of the american version of super turbo is glitchy and is insanely difficult even on the easy setting. Switching to the japanese version fixes that and makes that game fun to play offline as it should be. For no reason, they took back the update. I don’t like being locked with an inferior version of the game. I will change my review when Capcom finally upgrades everyone on all platforms to the international version

Qwilliam

Posted: October 25, 2018
They accidentally updated the game to include extra features and then they realised their mistake and are now taking away those features.

V I D A L

Posted: June 3, 2018
Due to lack of SF history from these developers, they ended up packing "outdated" versions of some of these titles. Some of these games got a second arcade released with a patched version. This collection uses the first unpatched broken version of these games. Even MAME do a better job letting you play the most updated version of those Roms. What a shame.

Hep

Posted: May 31, 2018
You can play 3rd Strike online from steam.

Etchasketch

Posted: October 24, 2018
This game is like a birthday party where the cake is made of cardboard and the presents are all empty boxes.

Honestly the blame goes to Digital Eclipse who handled this port. They’ve had six months to fix all of the bugs and issues this game has and have done it at a snails pace while the online population dwindled. You’re lucky to see 40 people online at most.

I have two main issues with the game: Lack of resolution options/stretching my screen and lack of volume control. This is 2018 and the most basic of options are missing. What confuses me the most is that the Capcom Beat’em Up bundle has these. It makes me feel like Digital Eclipse saw an opportunity for a quick cash grab with below minimal effort.

Such a shame but I guess we’ll have to wait and see what the 40th anniversary collection will be like.

AudioGalaxy

Posted: October 27, 2018
Are you just going to give us this crap of a compilition or are you willing to do the things us players want? Give all the international version, we want to change between the international and japanese versions of the games. Make an option to change the volume and the resolution. And how difficult is it to give us the latest revisions of the arcade games?

damien5700

Posted: June 30, 2018
A sloppy, lazy and embarassing effort by Digital Eclispe. If this is the best they can do Capcom needs to just build these compliations in house. I’m looking forward to the Japanese release, which should eclispe this mess easily, much like the second mega man collection.

First of all, this dev is too smug to communicate with their fanbase. Their twitter is basically just for show. They won’t even respond to Maximillian Dood. The official Street Fighter page is doing the work they should be responsible for. A patch was released a couple days ago. That’s very interesting because I can’t find any patch notes on Steam. Nothing new for this dev(dating back to Backbone) but is a really bad look in this day in age if you ask me.

So, the obvious good thing about this is the amount of games featured and the bonus content is well done(at the expense of other aspects).

Lets start with a mission statement from the "head of restoration" at Digital Eclispe:

"Movies have the Criterion Collection, but there hasn’t been anything like that for games"
"It’s like getting one of those ten-dollar boxes that have ten cowboy movie DVDs in them. Whereas we’re doing the [equivalent of] the Criterion Collection [release] of Unforgiven."

Its quite peculiar then that the Street Fighter 3 trilogy in this collection shipped with MONO SOUND. If they couldn’t even catch such an egregious gaffe like that pre-release, its no wonder why this collection is such a mess.

Oh, but they fixed it with the first patch, right?

Third Strike is still mono and therefore still sounds like garbage. OG and DI are "stereo", if your definition of stereo is sound coming from the right side of the screen coming out of the left speaker and vice versa. These games are renowned for their soundscapes and this is the respect they get.

Many arcade releases are the first version only for some inexplicable reason. Want to play Alpha 2 Gold or Alpha 3 Upper? Too bad. Want to play Alpha 2 online? Nope, and don’t ask us to add it because the 5 seconds it would take to give a reply is not an effecient use of Digital Eclispe’s time.

After the patch, diagonals are a crapshoot on the xbox one controller depending on which game you decide to play. Just great.

Achievement list, while usually fluff, shows the lack of creativity and passion put into this collection. Beat all of the arcade modes and the typical online ones. Such a missed opportunity here its not even funny.

Borders aren’t even tailored to the individual games.

If they are going to release these games in such a barebones state, they had better be polished and ready for primetime. Instead what we have is a beta release that sullies the brand just when Street Fighter 5 is picking up steam. Right now half of these games are unplayable and the online modes are pretty much dead on arrival.

Avoid.

Flaros Oceanic

Posted: April 10
After 20 years, i can finally Daigo Parry on PC without pirating.

HariboFiend

Posted: October 23, 2018
This is a "soft" recommendation.

There’s a lot of good and a lot of bad w/ this port.

The Good:
All the games are pretty close to their "true" arcade versions.
If you wanted a compilation package, this port is pretty good.

The Bad:
Online ranking is a travesty.
Online play isn’t better or worse than other available options for online play.
Lobby bugs are pretty bad and frequent.
Practice modes took a HUGE step backwards for some reason.


All in all, it’s a decent port of old games but there are other compilations that did a lot of things better.

Verdict:
Wait until a sale. $40 is a bit steep. If you’re a die-hard like me for 3s, it’s a great port. Best so far. But if you just want a compilation w/ online… Meh. I think $20-$30 is a fair ask.

But c’mon Capcom. Patch your messes.

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